More than 250 beekeepers converged on Young Harris Georgia in May for the 25th annual Young Harris-UGA Beekeeping Institute CAES News
Bee Institute Anniversary
For more than two decades, beekeepers from across the Southeast and beyond have come together each spring in the north Georgia mountains to talk bees, learn from each other and hobnob with some of the most renowned bee experts in the world.
Rows of cotton at a farm on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus in 2013. CAES News
Insect Scouting
Georgia farmers and agriculture consultants hoping to refine their scouting skills are invited to this year’s Insect Scout Schools, hosted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. The schools will be held in Tifton on Monday, June 13, and in Midville on Tuesday, June 21.
Overwintering kudzu bugs discovered in pine bark. CAES News
Kudzu Bug Decline
Once a nuisance for soybean farmers in the Southeast, kudzu bug populations appear to be declining in the U.S. The decline began in 2014 and is believed to have been brought on by two of the kudzu bug’s natural predators: a fungus and a wasp.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators is increasing. CAES News
Pollinator Decline
With reports of declining monarch butterfly populations and honeybee deaths, the plight of pollinators and other beneficial insects has been headlining the news for months now.
Abnormally dry conditions this summer have kept Georgia's mosquito populations mercifully low, but that's no reason for Georgians to let down their guard, especially this season. CAES News
Mosquito Season
With warmer temperatures around the corner, Georgia’s mosquito season won’t be far behind. This year the remote chance of a southeastern U.S. outbreak of Zika — a mosquito-borne virus now prevalent in parts of South America — has university and public health officials doubling down on their message of how to control the pest.