Browse Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production Stories

505 results found for Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year. CAES News
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year.
Citrus Crop
The citrus greening disease that has devastated Florida’s industry over the past decade is not affecting Georgia production, but growers should still be aware of the potential danger it can bring, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.
A year after the devastation of Hurricane Michael, Georgia's pecan farmers are preparing for this year's crop. Pictured are pecans on the ground following Hurricane Michael in Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
A year after the devastation of Hurricane Michael, Georgia's pecan farmers are preparing for this year's crop. Pictured are pecans on the ground following Hurricane Michael in Decatur County, Georgia.
Georgia Pecans
The pecan industry in the Southeast U.S. is at a crossroads, and the 2019 season could go a long way toward determining the financial future for many Georgia farmers, according to Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist.
UGA plant pathologist Tim Brenneman received a Friends of Southern IPM award at the Georgia Association of Plant Pathologists annual meeting. CAES News
UGA plant pathologist Tim Brenneman received a Friends of Southern IPM award at the Georgia Association of Plant Pathologists annual meeting.
Plant Pathologists Recognized
Two University of Georgia plant pathologists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences received the Friends of Southern Integrated Pest Management (IPM) awards at the Georgia Association of Plant Pathologists annual meeting in Savannah, Georgia on March 13.
UGA Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells is one of many featured speakers at this year's Pecan Beginners Course to be held on April 16. Interested pecan producers can attend the UGA Pecan Beginners Course to learn more about how to cultivate pecans in Georgia. CAES News
UGA Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells is one of many featured speakers at this year's Pecan Beginners Course to be held on April 16. Interested pecan producers can attend the UGA Pecan Beginners Course to learn more about how to cultivate pecans in Georgia.
Pecan Course
Georgia homeowners and farmers with hopes of producing pecan trees can learn the basics from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialists during the UGA Pecan Beginners Course on Tuesday, April 16.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
Pecan Pest
Ambrosia beetles are swarming south Georgia pecan orchards and farmers should take precautions now, according to Angel Acebes-Doria, pecan entomologist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp presented the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year award to Crawford County farmer Robert Dickey during a reception held Tuesday, March 19, at the Georgia Freight Depot in Atlanta. Pictured left to right are Kemp, Dickey, Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue. CAES News
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp presented the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year award to Crawford County farmer Robert Dickey during a reception held Tuesday, March 19, at the Georgia Freight Depot in Atlanta. Pictured left to right are Kemp, Dickey, Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue.
Top Farmer
Crawford County peach farmer Robert Dickey has been named the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year. A fourth-generation farmer, Dickey manages approximately 1,000 acres of peaches and 3,000 acres of timberland with the help of his 90-year-old father, Bob Dickey, his wife, Cynde Dickey, and their son and daughter-in-law, Lee and Stacy Dickey.
Pictured are the symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight disease on brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale. Alternaria is a foliar pathogen, and symptoms first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings. CAES News
Pictured are the symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight disease on brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale. Alternaria is a foliar pathogen, and symptoms first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings.
Alternaria leaf blight
Popular vegetables like broccoli and kale are among the crops that could be in danger from Alternaria leaf blight — a disease that can cause spots on some brassica crops and render them unmarketable — which has developed resistance to a once-dependable fungicide Georgia farmers rely on, according to Bhabesh Dutta, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist.
Homegrown tomatoes are one of the most popular fruits available at roadside produce stands. CAES News
Homegrown tomatoes are one of the most popular fruits available at roadside produce stands.
Produce Training
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Department of Agriculture will host a free one-day workshop for produce farmers on Thursday, March 14, at Little Ocmulgee State Park in Helena, Georgia.
During Tim Coolong’s years as a state ­vegetable specialist, his research focused on variety trials and developing irrigation and fertilization recommendations for farmers (photo by Dorothy Kozlowski). CAES News
During Tim Coolong’s years as a state ­vegetable specialist, his research focused on variety trials and developing irrigation and fertilization recommendations for farmers (photo by Dorothy Kozlowski).
Betting on Veggies
With the current focus on local food and farm-to-table eating, it’s hard to remember that 20 years ago very few people cared where their tomatoes came from. 
This picture shows peach trees blooming in middle Georgia. As temperatures increase, trees will start to bloom across the state, and farmers are wary of a late-season freeze in March. CAES News
This picture shows peach trees blooming in middle Georgia. As temperatures increase, trees will start to bloom across the state, and farmers are wary of a late-season freeze in March.
Peach Trees
Peach tree buds are naturally protected from freezing temperatures, but unseasonably warm temperatures in early February have some Georgia trees already beginning to bloom.