Browse Nuisance Animals Stories

7 results found for Nuisance Animals
Pictured is an overhead view of a cotton field affected by deer in Burke County, Georgia. Deer can damage as much as 50 percent of a farmer’s crop. Burke County Extension Agent Katie Burch may have found an effective deer deterrent in Milorganite fertilizer. CAES News
Pictured is an overhead view of a cotton field affected by deer in Burke County, Georgia. Deer can damage as much as 50 percent of a farmer’s crop. Burke County Extension Agent Katie Burch may have found an effective deer deterrent in Milorganite fertilizer.
Deer Management
The threat of deer eating the cotton grown on local farms sent University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent Katie Burch searching for a solution. And the Burke County, Georgia, agent may have found one.
Chipmunks are territorial and rarely become numerous enough to cause a significant amount of damage. However, when the resources are right, populations can reach 20 individuals or more in an urban landscape and start causing noticeable problems. CAES News
Chipmunks are territorial and rarely become numerous enough to cause a significant amount of damage. However, when the resources are right, populations can reach 20 individuals or more in an urban landscape and start causing noticeable problems.
Chipmunk Control
Chipmunks may look cute, but when they wreak havoc in the landscape their charm quickly fades. A species of small rodent, chipmunks are quite common in Georgia. They are considered minor agricultural pests, but they can cause significant structural damage under patios, stairs and retention walls.
Without removing wild pigs from the landscape, it is nearly impossible to prevent them from using and damaging wildlife food plots. Fortunately, it is possible to prevent wild pigs from raiding protein feeders. CAES News
Without removing wild pigs from the landscape, it is nearly impossible to prevent them from using and damaging wildlife food plots. Fortunately, it is possible to prevent wild pigs from raiding protein feeders.
Wild Pigs
Game feeders are often used to provide high-protein supplemental feeds to increase the body condition, antler size and overall survival rates within deer herds. Every year, thousands of tons of feed are distributed for whitetails, but a portion of that feed is consumed by wild pigs that readily displace native wildlife species.
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark. CAES News
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark.
Wild Spotter App
Thanks to a new app, citizen scientists can help researchers track and stop the spread of invasive species like feral pigs, Chinese privet, cogongrass and kudzu bugs by reporting and mapping sightings of these invasive species.
Snakes are a vital part of Georgia's ecosystem but most people don't want more snakes than necessary in their landscapes. To discourage snakes, keep landscapes well trimmed, clean and free of food or debris that could attract mice, rats or other snake prey. This albino corn snake is rare but native to Georgia. CAES News
Snakes are a vital part of Georgia's ecosystem but most people don't want more snakes than necessary in their landscapes. To discourage snakes, keep landscapes well trimmed, clean and free of food or debris that could attract mice, rats or other snake prey. This albino corn snake is rare but native to Georgia.
Snake Control
While snakes can provide significant ecological benefits, they impart fear in many people, hunt fish in ponds, and eat eggs and chicks in poultry houses.
The fictional Peter Rabbit isn't the only rabbit that enjoys munching in vegetable gardens. To keep rabbits out of home gardens, University of Georgia Extension specialists recommend building a fence around precious plants. The fence must be at least 2 feet high and must be buried 8 to 12 inches deep. CAES News
The fictional Peter Rabbit isn't the only rabbit that enjoys munching in vegetable gardens. To keep rabbits out of home gardens, University of Georgia Extension specialists recommend building a fence around precious plants. The fence must be at least 2 feet high and must be buried 8 to 12 inches deep.
Rabbit control
Rabbits are often welcomed additions to lawns because many homeowners find them adorable. They love to see rabbits at the edges of their lawns early in the morning or in the evening. However, if the population is left unchecked, rabbits can cost homeowners hundreds, even thousands, of dollars a year in damages.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension wildlife expert Michael Mengak tells visitors to a field day how a squirrel trap should be used. CAES News
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension wildlife expert Michael Mengak tells visitors to a field day how a squirrel trap should be used.
Critter control
Chewing pests have many Georgia homeowners wondering “Who dunnit?” when their favorite tree or shrub is scarred by teeth marks.