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30 results found for Invasive Species
A Joro spider found in Hoschton, Georgia in 2018. CAES News
A Joro spider found in Hoschton, Georgia in 2018.
Joro Spiders
If northeast Georgia yards seem a little extra spooky this Halloween season, there’s a good reason. They may have a little extra help from a new neighbor who is really into those cobweb decorations. 
The Asian longhorned tick, an invasive tick species recently identified in several Eastern U.S. states, has been documented as far south as North Carolina. CAES News
The Asian longhorned tick, an invasive tick species recently identified in several Eastern U.S. states, has been documented as far south as North Carolina.
Tick Smart
Georgia is already home to 22 species of ticks, but there may be another tiny bloodsucker hiding in the woods on your next hike.
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark. CAES News
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark.
Kudzu Bug
A tiny wasp — known as “Paratelenomus saccharalis” — is cutting down kudzu bug populations and Georgia soybean farmers’ need to treat for the pest, according to Michael Toews, a University of Georgia entomologist based on the UGA Tifton campus.
An Asian longhorned beetle chews through wood. CAES News
An Asian longhorned beetle chews through wood.
Invasive Species
Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, is concerned it could also lead to the establishment of more invasive species.
Phillip Roberts, Extension entomologist with the University of Georgia Tifton Campus, searches a soybean plant at a field in Midville for kudzu bugs. CAES News
Phillip Roberts, Extension entomologist with the University of Georgia Tifton Campus, searches a soybean plant at a field in Midville for kudzu bugs.
Kudzu Bug Resistance
Kudzu bugs are not native to Georgia, but in the past seven years, they’ve made their homes in soybean fields across the southeastern U.S.
As part of the LepNet project, Joe McHugh, professor of entomology at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and curator of the arthropod collection at the Georgia Museum of Natural History, will help lead the effort to digitize millions of butterfly and moth specimens now locked away in museum collections across the nation. CAES News
As part of the LepNet project, Joe McHugh, professor of entomology at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and curator of the arthropod collection at the Georgia Museum of Natural History, will help lead the effort to digitize millions of butterfly and moth specimens now locked away in museum collections across the nation.
Museum Collection Digitized
Locked in museums across the world, millions of insect specimens tell the story of the world’s climatic shifts, animals on the move and changing fauna.
Rows of cotton at a farm on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus in 2013. CAES News
Rows of cotton at a farm on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus in 2013.
Insect Scouting
Georgia farmers and agriculture consultants hoping to refine their scouting skills are invited to this year’s Insect Scout Schools, hosted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. The schools will be held in Tifton on Monday, June 13, and in Midville on Tuesday, June 21.
Overwintering kudzu bugs discovered in pine bark. CAES News
Overwintering kudzu bugs discovered in pine bark.
Kudzu Bug Decline
Once a nuisance for soybean farmers in the Southeast, kudzu bug populations appear to be declining in the U.S. The decline began in 2014 and is believed to have been brought on by two of the kudzu bug’s natural predators: a fungus and a wasp.
Johnsongrass, known scientifically as Sorghum halepense, grows happily in a field it invaded. The weed continues to cause millions of dollars in lost agricultural revenue each year. CAES News
Johnsongrass, known scientifically as Sorghum halepense, grows happily in a field it invaded. The weed continues to cause millions of dollars in lost agricultural revenue each year.
Combatting Johnsongrass
A team of researchers led by faculty at the University of Georgia have received a $5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to find new ways of combating Johnsongrass, one of the most widespread and troublesome agricultural weeds in the world.
Many Georgians are confusing the common wheel bug, which is beneficial in Georgia gardens, with the kissing bug, which made news earlier this fall. CAES News
Many Georgians are confusing the common wheel bug, which is beneficial in Georgia gardens, with the kissing bug, which made news earlier this fall.
Kissing Bugs
Over the last few weeks, many Georgians have focused their attention on the media-hyped coverage of the kissing bug. Much of the sensationalism and worry surrounding this insect boogieman is unwarranted, according to University of Georgia entomologists.