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Bethany Harris' UGA degrees exposed her to working with pollinators and butterflies, so her job as assistant director of education at Callaway Gardens is a perfect fit. “In addition to the butterfly center, we have an outdoor butterfly garden and my research at UGA centered around native pollinators and butterflies," she said. CAES News
Bethany Harris' UGA degrees exposed her to working with pollinators and butterflies, so her job as assistant director of education at Callaway Gardens is a perfect fit. “In addition to the butterfly center, we have an outdoor butterfly garden and my research at UGA centered around native pollinators and butterflies," she said.
Triple Dawg
Bethany Harris has found the perfect job using her entomology and horticulture education from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. As assistant director of education at Callaway Gardens, Harris truly works out in the field, overseeing the butterfly center and educational gardens, managing over 200 volunteers, and teaching workshops for the public.
The research group under Michael Toews scouts sugarcane aphids. CAES News
The research group under Michael Toews scouts sugarcane aphids.
Sugarcane Aphids
A team of agricultural scientists across the Southeast are using a $1.8 million U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) grant to study the impact of aphids in sorghum crops.
D.W. Brooks Award of Excellence winners Marc van Iersel, Vincent J. Dooley Professor of Horticulture; Lori Purcell Bledsoe, Georgia 4-H program development coordinator for Northeast Georgia; and Alfredo Martinez-Espinoza, professor of plant pathology, are congratulated by CAES Dean and Director Sam Pardue. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Award of Excellence winners Marc van Iersel, Vincent J. Dooley Professor of Horticulture; Lori Purcell Bledsoe, Georgia 4-H program development coordinator for Northeast Georgia; and Alfredo Martinez-Espinoza, professor of plant pathology, are congratulated by CAES Dean and Director Sam Pardue.
D.W. Brooks Lecture
The students and faculty of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences came together Nov. 12 to celebrate the progress that agriculture has made in the past 50 years and the promise of innovations to come.
University of Georgia Regents' Professor Michael R. Strand has received one of the highest honors a scientist can receive — election to the National Academy of Sciences. CAES News
University of Georgia Regents' Professor Michael R. Strand has received one of the highest honors a scientist can receive — election to the National Academy of Sciences.
Pulliam Chair
Professor Michael Strand has dedicated his career to unlocking the power of basic science to improve agriculture, and that dedication has earned him the recognition of the state’s agricultural community.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
Ambrosia Beetles
Research entomologists in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are using three grants to study ambrosia beetles in an effort to prevent future attacks and preserve more fruit and nut trees.
Georgia Farm Bureau President Gerald Long (center) announced the recipients of the GFB Harvest 20 Research Grants at the GFB Commodity Conference on Aug. 8. University of Georgia faculty who were awarded grants are (l-r) Lawton Stewart, Govindaraj Dev Kumar, Angelita Acebes, Sudeep Bag, Jonathan Oliver and (not pictured) Bhabesh Dutta and Mark Freeman. CAES News
Georgia Farm Bureau President Gerald Long (center) announced the recipients of the GFB Harvest 20 Research Grants at the GFB Commodity Conference on Aug. 8. University of Georgia faculty who were awarded grants are (l-r) Lawton Stewart, Govindaraj Dev Kumar, Angelita Acebes, Sudeep Bag, Jonathan Oliver and (not pictured) Bhabesh Dutta and Mark Freeman.
Harvest 20 Grants
The Georgia Farm Bureau (GFB) has awarded $94,000 in research grants to seven University of Georgia scientists and their research teams who are addressing production issues impacting Georgia farmers.
Entomologist Bill Snyder studies how beneficial bacteria and fungi in the soil allow plants to protect themselves against plant-feeding insects and attract predatory insects to their defense. He also collaborates with farmers interested in learning more about beneficial insects, birds, or soil organisms on their farms. Snyder joined the University of Georgia in July. CAES News
Entomologist Bill Snyder studies how beneficial bacteria and fungi in the soil allow plants to protect themselves against plant-feeding insects and attract predatory insects to their defense. He also collaborates with farmers interested in learning more about beneficial insects, birds, or soil organisms on their farms. Snyder joined the University of Georgia in July.
New Entomologist
Bill Snyder, the newest researcher to join the University of Georgia Department of Entomology, is looking forward to working with the wide diversity of soils, climates and cropping systems in the Southeastern U.S.
Whiteflies transmit several devastating viruses to important vegetable crops, including squash. CAES News
Whiteflies transmit several devastating viruses to important vegetable crops, including squash.
Whitefly Management
Researchers from three research institutions are using a $3.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fight whiteflies on vegetable crops.
Live from the Lab CAES News
Live from the Lab
Live from the Lab
Back for its fourth semester, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences' Live from the Lab series will be taking Georgians back inside the college's labs to talk to world-class researchers about their work.
Linden Pederson graduated from UGA in 2019 with degrees in scientific illustration and entomology, but she left behind her sculpture of a giant beetle, Megalodacne heros. The beetle, which is housed in the hallway of the UGA Department of Entomology, took her hundreds of hours to sculpt and is anatomically correct down to the tiniest hair. CAES News
Linden Pederson graduated from UGA in 2019 with degrees in scientific illustration and entomology, but she left behind her sculpture of a giant beetle, Megalodacne heros. The beetle, which is housed in the hallway of the UGA Department of Entomology, took her hundreds of hours to sculpt and is anatomically correct down to the tiniest hair.
Giant Beetle
During her undergraduate years, Linden Pederson was dedicated to helping others appreciate the beauty of insects. She spent hours drawing insects or introducing the public to live insects as part of the University of Georgia Bug Dawgs Insect Zoo, but her senior project dwarfs those efforts.