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College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences students Chad Cain, Sam Bignault, Joshua Toran and Logan Waldrop pose in front of a cathedral in Malaga, Spain, during the Spain: Food Production, Culture and the Environment study abroad program in 2019. CAES News
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences students Chad Cain, Sam Bignault, Joshua Toran and Logan Waldrop pose in front of a cathedral in Malaga, Spain, during the Spain: Food Production, Culture and the Environment study abroad program in 2019.
Spain Study Abroad
Time abroad looks different for every student. Some are seasoned travelers looking to fuel their sense of adventure. For others, studying abroad is the first chance they’ve had to explore a new country.
Ibrahima Diedhiou of the University of Thies in Senegal talks to Peanut Innovation Lab Director Dave Hoisington. Diedhiou studies how wild shrubs in the arid Sahel region of Western Africa may improve crop yields and remediate degraded soils. Now – with the support of the Peanut Innovation Lab – he’s testing how the shrubs work in Senegalese farmers’ peanut fields. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
Ibrahima Diedhiou of the University of Thies in Senegal talks to Peanut Innovation Lab Director Dave Hoisington. Diedhiou studies how wild shrubs in the arid Sahel region of Western Africa may improve crop yields and remediate degraded soils. Now – with the support of the Peanut Innovation Lab – he’s testing how the shrubs work in Senegalese farmers’ peanut fields. (Photo by Allison Floyd)
Shrub helpers
Shrubs that grow wild in West Africa could be key in boosting yield and giving farmers assurance that they can make a profitable crop, even in the drought prone, food insecure Sahel region. Through the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab, researchers are exploring how best to use two shrubs species in cultivated peanut fields in Senegal to improve the soil health, tap into moisture far below ground and lower soil temperatures.
The Peanut Innovation Lab at the University of Georgia hosted a meeting in Dakar, Senegal in October for researchers from the U.S. and Western Africa working together on research in the areas of peanut variety development, value chain improvements and empowering women and youth. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
The Peanut Innovation Lab at the University of Georgia hosted a meeting in Dakar, Senegal in October for researchers from the U.S. and Western Africa working together on research in the areas of peanut variety development, value chain improvements and empowering women and youth. (Photo by Allison Floyd)
Peanut Lab in Senegal
The Peanut Innovation Lab launched its portfolio of projects in Senegal in October, bringing together scientists from Virginia Tech, University of California-Santa Barbara, University of Georgia and The Ohio State University with colleagues in Senegalese research and education institutions.
The University of Georgia has received a $14 million grant from the U.S. Agency of International Development to manage the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Research, known as the “Peanut Lab,” a global peanut research program that works to alleviate hunger by helping farmers in developing countries grow healthy crops. The agreement builds on UGA and USAID's long-standing partnership on global peanut research, which dates back to the 1980s. CAES News
The University of Georgia has received a $14 million grant from the U.S. Agency of International Development to manage the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Research, known as the “Peanut Lab,” a global peanut research program that works to alleviate hunger by helping farmers in developing countries grow healthy crops. The agreement builds on UGA and USAID's long-standing partnership on global peanut research, which dates back to the 1980s.
Food Security Summit
For the past decade, demographers have predicted that the world would have to double its food supply by 2050 to feed the growing population.
The former executive director of the United Nations World Food Programme, Ertharin Cousin, talks to a boy in the Central African Republic during her visit in late March 2014. Photo by World Food Prize. Not for reuse. CAES News
The former executive director of the United Nations World Food Programme, Ertharin Cousin, talks to a boy in the Central African Republic during her visit in late March 2014. Photo by World Food Prize. Not for reuse.
D.W. Brooks Lecture and Awards
Former Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme Ertharin Cousin has spent her career working to build more robust and sustainable food systems in food insecure countries around the world.
International visitors to the Georgia Peanut Tour pose on the Chase family farm near
Oglethorpe, Ga., in September 2019. The Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab at the University of Georgia has facilitated visits from international partners for several years. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
International visitors to the Georgia Peanut Tour pose on the Chase family farm near
Oglethorpe, Ga., in September 2019. The Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab at the University of Georgia has facilitated visits from international partners for several years. (Photo by Allison Floyd)
Peanut Tour
The Peanut Innovation Lab bookended the annual Georgia Peanut Tour, the third week in September, with two more days of activities this year, giving two international groups an even deeper dive into peanut production in the state.
David Jordan, a crop science professor at North Carolina State University, is lead scientist on a project through the Peanut Innovation Lab at the University of Georgia to update a risk assessment tool for farmers in North Carolina and overseas partners. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
David Jordan, a crop science professor at North Carolina State University, is lead scientist on a project through the Peanut Innovation Lab at the University of Georgia to update a risk assessment tool for farmers in North Carolina and overseas partners. (Photo by Allison Floyd)
Peanut risk
Researchers in North Carolina have updated a risk assessment tool that empowers peanut farmers there to decide when a pest, weed or weather condition threatens yield enough to invest in fighting it. Along with updating the Peanut Risk Tool to be more usable in North Carolina, the work will make the resource available to extension specialists in other countries, as well, giving them the same ability to forecast risk and reward in the field.
Scientists and students working through the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab to research peanut farming, marketing and nutrition in Ghana, met in Tamale in July to officially start work. The Innovation Lab is headquartered at the University of Georgia through an agreement with the U.S. Agency for International Development. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
Scientists and students working through the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab to research peanut farming, marketing and nutrition in Ghana, met in Tamale in July to officially start work. The Innovation Lab is headquartered at the University of Georgia through an agreement with the U.S. Agency for International Development. (Photo by Allison Floyd)
Ghana peanut projects
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut officially started several projects in Ghana this month with a launch meeting to bring together teams of scientists and students from the U.S. and the West African country. The lab is managed out of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences through an agreement with the U.S. Agency for International Development, but involves scientists from a dozen U.S. universities, as well as institutions across partner countries.
African peanut breeders stand in a field in Senegal in 2018, where seeds are replicated for a project to map the genetic diversity of lines grown on the continent. Working with the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab headquartered at the University of Georgia, scientists genotyped hundreds of lines of peanuts grown across Africa. CAES News
African peanut breeders stand in a field in Senegal in 2018, where seeds are replicated for a project to map the genetic diversity of lines grown on the continent. Working with the Feed the Future Peanut Innovation Lab headquartered at the University of Georgia, scientists genotyped hundreds of lines of peanuts grown across Africa.
African peanut genomics
Groundnut breeders across Africa have wondered at the differences they’d see in nuts that were called the same name but didn’t look alike. Last year, a group of breeders from across the continent put together hundreds of lines of peanuts and, under the auspices of the Peanut Innovation Lab, found out just how similar or different their peanut lines are. The scientists from the national programs in nine countries –Senegal, Ghana, Mali, Togo, Gambia, Uganda, Malawi, Zambia, and Mozambique – met with U.S. scientists last month to review the data collected through an Innovation Lab project called “Genotypic analysis of peanut germplasm using the Axiom_Arachis2 SNP array.”
A farmer from Northern Ghana speaks at the inaugural meeting of the Ghana Groundnut Working Group, a new organization that aims to improve peanut farming, marketing and nutrition in the West African country by bringing together experts across the value chain. The Peanut Innovation Lab at UGA, which is a member of the American Peanut Research and Education Society, sponsored the first meeting. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
A farmer from Northern Ghana speaks at the inaugural meeting of the Ghana Groundnut Working Group, a new organization that aims to improve peanut farming, marketing and nutrition in the West African country by bringing together experts across the value chain. The Peanut Innovation Lab at UGA, which is a member of the American Peanut Research and Education Society, sponsored the first meeting. (Photo by Allison Floyd)
Ghana groundnut group
Bringing together experts in groundnut research from across Ghana, a new organization of scientists aspires to boost the size of the crop and profit for farmers, improve the quality of groundnuts consumers see at the market and increase the supply of nutritious and safe food served in homes. The Ghana Groundnut Working Group met for the first time in July to explore peanut production, economics, technology and benefits in Ghana. The model for the meeting is the American Peanut Research and Education Society, a 51-year-old organization in the United States that has helped the peanut industry in the Americas weather disease and other production problems over recent decades.