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Students in Glen Harris' Soils and Hydrology class pose for a picture at Providence Canyon. CAES News
Students in Glen Harris' Soils and Hydrology class pose for a picture at Providence Canyon.
Classroom Road Trips
Hands-on learning opportunities are a focal point for students in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) on the University of Georgia Tifton campus and a key part of its academic mission.
Henry Sintim joined the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences on Aug. 1 as an assistant professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences. CAES News
Henry Sintim joined the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences on Aug. 1 as an assistant professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences.
Soil Scientist
Georgia feels like home for Ghana-native soil scientist Henry Sintim, and that’s what drew him to the University of Georgia Tifton campus.
The senior Liberty County Land Judging Team won first place in Georgia 4-H's 2020 State Land Judging Contest. The team will now represent Georgia at the 2020 National Land Judging Contest in May in Oklahoma. The team is comprised of Makayla Nash, Kelly Lachowsky, Jonathan Woolf and Melvin Kimble. CAES News
The senior Liberty County Land Judging Team won first place in Georgia 4-H's 2020 State Land Judging Contest. The team will now represent Georgia at the 2020 National Land Judging Contest in May in Oklahoma. The team is comprised of Makayla Nash, Kelly Lachowsky, Jonathan Woolf and Melvin Kimble.
Land Judging
Sixty-five Georgia 4-H'ers participated in the 2020 State Land Judging Contest held Aug. 24 at Flinchum’s Phoenix, located in the University of Georgia Whitehall Forest in Athens, Georgia. Teams from eight counties all over Georgia competed, a 23% increase in participation from previous years.
UGA Extension cotton agronomist Mark Freeman tells a crowd about the cotton variety trials being conducted at the J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center at the farm's 2019 corn boil. CAES News
UGA Extension cotton agronomist Mark Freeman tells a crowd about the cotton variety trials being conducted at the J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center at the farm's 2019 corn boil.
Corn Boil
About 180 northeast Georgians and University of Georgia faculty and staff toured the J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center on June 25 as part of the center’s Annual Corn Boil and Field Day.
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia. CAES News
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia.
Nematode Impact
A recent University of Georgia Cooperative Extension survey of 431 Georgia vegetable fields found that more than 60% contained root-knot nematodes, tiny parasitic worms that feed on roots and destroy plants.
UGA organic horticulture expert Julia Gaskin is shown teaching participants about soil composition at the 2011 Georgia Organics Conference. Gaskin will help lead a presentation during the 2019 Georgia Organics Conference in Tifton, Georgia on Feb. 8-9. CAES News
UGA organic horticulture expert Julia Gaskin is shown teaching participants about soil composition at the 2011 Georgia Organics Conference. Gaskin will help lead a presentation during the 2019 Georgia Organics Conference in Tifton, Georgia on Feb. 8-9.
Walter Barnard Hill Award
For the past 19 years, Julia Gaskin has worked to prove that conservation tillage and cover crops don’t have to be dirty words when it comes to conventional farming. 
A conservation tillage system begins with a cover crop that's planted during the fallow times of the year, such as late fall and early winter when row crops have been harvested. Pictured is corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
A conservation tillage system begins with a cover crop that's planted during the fallow times of the year, such as late fall and early winter when row crops have been harvested. Pictured is corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia.
Conservation Tillage
Conservation tillage saves farmers time and money and improves the soil, but only 20 or 30 percent of Georgia farmers use this system, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension soils and fertility specialist Glen Harris.
Alexandra Bentz, a poultry science graduate student at UGA, spent her summer studying the health of vampire bats in Belize. CAES News
Alexandra Bentz, a poultry science graduate student at UGA, spent her summer studying the health of vampire bats in Belize.
Graduate Student Travel Awards
his summer University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences students traveled the world with help from the college’s Office of Global Programs’ Graduate International Travel Awards.
A soil moisture sensor in a cornfield behind NESPAL on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
A soil moisture sensor in a cornfield behind NESPAL on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Sensor Placement
Knowing the best place to install soil moisture sensors in fields, and how many, helps farmers optimize their water use, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension precision agriculture and irrigation specialist Wes Porter.
Perfect composting conditions require the perfect combination of materials — not too much brown matter, not too much green matter, not too cold and not too dry. CAES News
Perfect composting conditions require the perfect combination of materials — not too much brown matter, not too much green matter, not too cold and not too dry.
Composting Tips
Composting organisms are like people — both need water to survive and function at their best. Inadequate water will inhibit the activities of composting organisms, resulting in a slower composting process. If the compost pile is too moist, however, water will displace air and create anaerobic conditions in the pile.