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The Rose Garden, and all the other gardens, at the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia, are adorned with lights for the holiday season. The light show, called “Jewel in a Savannah Christmas,” runs from 6 to 9 p.m. on select evenings from Friday, Nov. 24 through Christmas Eve, Dec. 24. CAES News
The Rose Garden, and all the other gardens, at the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia, are adorned with lights for the holiday season. The light show, called “Jewel in a Savannah Christmas,” runs from 6 to 9 p.m. on select evenings from Friday, Nov. 24 through Christmas Eve, Dec. 24.
Nights and Lights
Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens (CGBG) at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia, has dressed its gardens with millions of lights in preparation for the arrival of Santa Claus on Dec. 6.
At 75, Frank Williams is retired from his position as the groundskeeper for the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia. But he still works there three days a week and he hasn't slowed down a bit. CAES News
At 75, Frank Williams is retired from his position as the groundskeeper for the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia. But he still works there three days a week and he hasn't slowed down a bit.
Williams Honored
After more than 30 years, Frank Williams has retired from his position as the groundskeeper for the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden (CGBG) at the Historic Bamboo Farm, but he still works there three days a week. Even at 75, he hasn’t slowed down.
The golden-colored 'Caramel' and rust-colored 'Lava Lamp' are two hybrids of Heuchera villosa growing in the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah. CAES News
The golden-colored 'Caramel' and rust-colored 'Lava Lamp' are two hybrids of Heuchera villosa growing in the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah.
Coral Bells
Coral bells deserve a place in the sun, partial shade or shade. Plant them along woodland trails, in front of shrubs or partner them with wood fern or autumn fern or even hostas. Gardeners in the South must try them as a sunny, cool-season component plant.
Lamiums reach a height of 8 to 12 inches with a spread of 24 inches, making them a perfect spiller plant in mixed containers. CAES News
Lamiums reach a height of 8 to 12 inches with a spread of 24 inches, making them a perfect spiller plant in mixed containers.
Deadnettle's Not Dead
January is typically a self-induced holding pattern when it comes to gardening. But if you find that you failed to get cool-season containers planted, then take advantage of fresh shipments of pansies, violas, petunias, dianthus and all the other component plants, like lamiums, as they arrive at your garden center.
Bright Lights Swiss chard is like a beet without a bottom. CAES News
Bright Lights Swiss chard is like a beet without a bottom.
Swiss Chard
There's a lot to love about Swiss chard. It is highly ornamental and wonderfully edible.
Mixed containers featuring trailing pansies and dianthus make this Old Town patio in Columbus, Georgia, a cool season delight. CAES News
Mixed containers featuring trailing pansies and dianthus make this Old Town patio in Columbus, Georgia, a cool season delight.
Pansy Partners
Trailing foliage and flowers are equally paramount to designing mixed baskets and containers in the cool season. Throughout the Old Town community in Columbus, Georgia, container gardens make colorful statements.
Known as “Euphorbia x martinii,” 'Ascot Rainbow' is native to Australia, where the name “Ascot” is associated with an old, wealthy suburb of Brisbane. CAES News
Known as “Euphorbia x martinii,” 'Ascot Rainbow' is native to Australia, where the name “Ascot” is associated with an old, wealthy suburb of Brisbane.
Garden Royalty
Botanically speaking, ‘Ascot Rainbow’ is known as “Euphorbia x martinii.” It is native to Australia, where the name “Ascot” is associated with an old, wealthy suburb of Brisbane. In truth, it is known as a spurge, which we most often associate with a host of terrible weeds. ‘Ascot Rainbow,’ however, is worthy of garden royalty.
The red misplaced sage (Salvia disjuncta) and Copper Canyon daisy (Tagetes lemmonii) create a wonderful fall combination in the landscape. CAES News
The red misplaced sage (Salvia disjuncta) and Copper Canyon daisy (Tagetes lemmonii) create a wonderful fall combination in the landscape.
Fall-blooming Salvias
Salvias are deer-resistant perennials that create excitement in the garden by virtue of their spiky blooms. They also attract hummingbirds and pollinators.
While collards are really old fashioned, the application with ornamentals is new and trendy. Their monolithic blue-green leaves can serve as an amazing backdrop to pansies and snapdragons CAES News
While collards are really old fashioned, the application with ornamentals is new and trendy. Their monolithic blue-green leaves can serve as an amazing backdrop to pansies and snapdragons
Brassicas in Beds
The Brassicas are taking center stage! In the fall and winter seasons, we have always dabbled in flowering kale and cabbage, but it seems in the last couple of years that things are changing. The cruciferous crops are doing their part to create the wow factor in flower beds across Georgia. It’s not just flowering kale and cabbage on display, but edibles like the Toscano kale and – would you believe it – that old, Southern favorite, collards.
Ornamentals, like native azalea 'Rosy Cheeks,' perform well when planted in the fall. The key is to follow proper planting techniques. This includes digging the planting hole twice as big as the plant's rootball and breaking up the rootball before planting. CAES News
Ornamentals, like native azalea 'Rosy Cheeks,' perform well when planted in the fall. The key is to follow proper planting techniques. This includes digging the planting hole twice as big as the plant's rootball and breaking up the rootball before planting.
Drought & Plants
Prolonged dry weather has prompted an elevated drought response for northwest Georgia. But under all levels of drought response, new plant material can be installed under a 30-day exemption period. Once the establishment period has expired, the drought-response watering practices must be followed accordingly.