The most common species of fruit fly has red/orange eyes, but not all fruit flies have red/orange eyes. Fruit flies, typically just an eighth of an inch in size, often hover around and just above food (most often decomposing vegetable matter) prior to landing.

Habits: Feed mainly on decaying vegetable matter, compost, rotting fruit, etc. Often found around salad bars and restaurants where vegetable matter and juices collect. Also called vinegar flies, since vinegar (acetic acid) is a decomposition product of some rotting vegetable matter.

Interventions: Find larval fly feeding site(s) and clean or otherwise throw away rotting fruit or vegetable matter. Remove garbage, including the plastic liner, and other refuse at least twice per week.

Might Be Confused With: humpbacked flies, fungus gnats, moth flies. CAES News
Fruit Flies
Fruit flies can be a problem year-round, but are especially common during late summer and fall because they are attracted to ripe or fermenting fruits and vegetables. The best way to avoid problems with fruit flies is to eliminate sources of attraction.
Don't let fire ants ruin your summer afternoons. CAES News
Ant Control
Fall is the best time to control fire ants, so start next year’s battle plan now. Fire ant colonies have been growing all summer and will have reached their peak size by the end of September. It is best to attack these colonies before cooler weather sends them deep into the ground.
University of Georgia agricultural specialist Robbie Beck clears a plot of land on the UGA Westbrook Farm in preparation for the Sept. 17 Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day. CAES News
Agroforestry & Wildlife Field Day
Controlling coyotes and clearing trees will top the list of popular topics at the Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day on Thursday, Sept. 17, at the University of Georgia’s Westbrook Research Farm in Griffin, Georgia.
Insecticide-resistant head lice have been found in 37 states including Georgia, but there is no reason to panic. CAES News
"Super" Lice
As if starting the new school year wasn’t stressful enough, a recent study found that Georgia is now home to insecticide-resistant head lice.
The 2015 class of the CAES Young Scholars Program spent this summer performing research in labs and fields in Griifin, Tifton and Athens. CAES News
Young Scholars 2015
This summer 83 high school students from across Georgia gained real-world research experience through the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences' (CAES) Young Scholars Program.
The groundbreaking ceremony for the University of Georgia's new turfgrass research and education facilities included, left to right, UGA doctoral student Becky Grubbs; Pamela Whitten, senior vice president for academic affairs and provost; Griff Doyle, vice president for government relations; Jennifer Frum, vice president for public service and outreach; Rep. Terry England (R-Auburn); Tommy Hopkins, regent of the University System of Georgia; UGA President Jere W. Morehead; Scott Angle, dean and director of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; Ken Morrow, president of Sod Atlanta Inc.; and Sen. John Wilkinson (R-Dist.50). CAES News
New Turf Facilities
More than 200 people gathered June 24 for a groundbreaking ceremony that brought new turfgrass research and education facilities on the University of Georgia’s campuses in Griffin, Tifton and Athens one step closer to completion.