News Stories - Page 5

Trap-jaw ants show remarkable diversity in the length of the jaw and how wide it opens. CAES News
Fast Snaps
Trap-jaw ants are famous for having one of the natural world’s fastest movements, and a new study led by a University of Georgia graduate shows that the core mechanism that allows this speedy movement evolved multiple times within a single ant genus, leading to the spectacular diversification of mandible shape each time.
FABricate is an entrepreneurial pitch contest hosted by the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Proposals are due Feb. 20 for the 2021 contest. CAES News
FABricate 2021
It’s not too late for University of Georgia students to turn their novel ideas into a chance at a grand prize of $10,000.
Natural predators from turf lawns were placed in petri dishes where the marks made by the insects were preserved in soft clay. CAES News
Tracking Bug Tracks
Modeling clay isn’t limited to art classrooms and sculpting studios. University of Georgia researchers developed a tool to track beneficial insects in turfgrass systems using clay models. Tracking these good predators can help develop eco-friendly pest management techniques for both home lawns and commercial sod growers.
The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will hold a virtual convocation ceremony at noon on Friday, Dec. 18, to celebrate new graduates. CAES News
Fall 2020 Convocation
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will hold a virtual convocation ceremony at noon on Friday, Dec. 18, to celebrate new graduates.
Joro spiders, which can be nearly 3 inches across when their legs are fully extended, are roughly the same size as banana spiders and yellow garden spiders, but they have distinctive yellow and blue-black stripes on their backs and bright red markings on their undersides, which are unique. CAES News
Striking species has golden webs, snacks on some stink bugs.
Chances are, if you live in northeast Georgia you’ve come across an East Asian Joro spider this fall.  
A supergene is a collection of neighboring genes located on a chromosome that are inherited together due to close genetic linkage. Studying these unique genes is important to understanding the potential causes for differences among the social structure of fire ants, specifically for controlling the species and building upon the existing knowledge base. CAES News
Fire ant supergene
A unique study conducted by University of Georgia entomologists led to the discovery of a distinctive supergene in fire ant colonies that determines whether young queen ants will leave their birth colony to start their own new colony or if they will join one with multiple queens. Researchers also found that ants were more aggressive toward queens who don’t possess the supergene, causing colony workers to kill them. This critical finding opens the door to new pest control methods that may be more efficient in eradicating problematic fire ant colonies.