News Stories - Page 9

Spending time outdoors, including activities such as UGA Extension's Great Georgia Pollinator Census to be held Aug. 21-22, offers numerous physical and mental health benefits such as reduced stress, greater cognitive functioning and increased physical activity. CAES News
Pollinator Census 2020
Students and families are encouraged to participate in the second annual Great Georgia Pollinator Census on August 21-22 coordinated by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Abnormally dry conditions this summer have kept Georgia's mosquito populations mercifully low, but that's no reason for Georgians to let down their guard, especially this season. CAES News
Mosquito Control
It officially turned summer this past weekend and the weather forecast seems to agree, with thunderstorms and warm nights in our future. These conditions are pretty typical for summer in Georgia — and excellent for mosquito development.
Abnormally dry conditions this summer have kept Georgia's mosquito populations mercifully low, but that's no reason for Georgians to let down their guard, especially this season. CAES News
Pandemic Mosquito Control
There has never been a better time to focus on mosquito prevention around our homes and yards than while being at home right now. Using some of our free time now will go a long way to having a more enjoyable summer.
Native wildflowers grow in field margins. CAES News
On-farm Biodiversity
The future of food and farms is largely dependent on the collective effort of us all to support more sustainable practices in agriculture — it’s not enough to just be profitable. Agricultural lands have the potential to be some of the most biodiverse landscapes in our increasingly urbanized world.   
Brown thrasher CAES News
Birds thrive on farms
A study by the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and collaborators at The Nature Conservancy and Washington State University challenges the notion that native bird species only belong in wooded habitats. This study has found that diversified farms are mutually beneficial for producers and native wildlife, creating a system where conservation and production are equal priorities.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia Beetles
Georgia pecan growers should be monitoring for ambrosia beetle now, especially if they have planted new trees or their orchards include trees that are less than three years old. The tell-tale sawdust “toothpicks” sticking out of trees is a sure sign of ambrosia beetles boring into trees.