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College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers tested biodegradable pots made from (left to right) wood pulp fiber, cow manure and coconut coir. CAES News
Sustainable Gardening
Professional and home gardeners alike can grow landscapes sustainably with the help of biodegradable plant containers, but gardeners may wonder whether these containers decompose quickly enough to avoid hindering plant growth.
Bob Westerfield, UGA Extension consumer horticulturist, demonstrates a pruning technique during a class held on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Plant Pruning
To prune or not to prune, that is the question. Pruning is an important part of maintaining plant health and maximizing plant productivity. This is often a topic that brings fear and confusion, but pruning is, in fact, a beneficial and routine task.
A statewide survey is currently open to the public for anyone who is not already a Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer and may be interested in the program or its services. A Master Gardener, pictured here, takes photographs of insects at the UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin. (file photo) CAES News
Master Gardener Survey
You may have relied on advice from a Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer in the past. Now they want your input to make plans for the future.
Many of the leaf spot diseases that are apparent on hydrangeas in the fall are actually the result of infections that occurred in the spring. Cercospora leaf spot, pictured here, is a common disease on bigleaf hydrangeas. CAES News
Seeing Spots
With all of the rain that we’ve experienced this year, many fungal leaf spot diseases are active. Hydrangeas are particularly susceptible to several different leaf spot diseases that favor moist weather. Some of the most common diseases people ask about are known as Corynespora leaf spot and Cercospora leaf spot on bigleaf hydrangeas.
Seeds for cultivars like ‘Mr. Lovell’s Wintergreens’ that have been passed down for generations in the north Georgia mountains will now be stored in refrigeration at the UGA Mountain Research and Education Center. (photo contributed by UNG) CAES News
Appalachian Seed Saving
Gold may be rare in the north Georgia mountains, but now the region boasts a seed bank that might be worth just as much to Appalachian natives and local gardening enthusiasts.
Citizen scientists around the state can help keep track of pollinator health in Georgia by participating in the second Great Georgia Pollinator Census Aug. 21 and 22. CAES News
Counting Pollinators
Friday kicks off the second annual Great Georgia Pollinator Census coordinated by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Symptoms of dollar spot include circular discolorations only a few inches in diameter. Spots may run together causing large, irregular patterns. CAES News
Lawn Maintenance
With the heat of summer bearing down on us, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension turfgrass specialists recommend that residents stick to a schedule for healthy lawn maintenance.
Evergreen and deciduous plants of different colors and forms can be used together to create a visually appealing landscape. CAES News
Shrub Recommendations
Do you have a small landscape, but want to add shrubs that will not overgrow the space? It is important to select plants that are suitable for the space and visually appealing.
Photos of seeds available at a recent seed swap at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia. CAES News
Online School Garden Workshop
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will be offering a free, online school garden symposium for educators starting at 10 a.m. June 16.
UGA researchers released new red 'RubyCrisp' muscadine variety for those who want a sweet berry flavor with just a hint of muscadine. CAES News
Sweet, Red Muscadine
From late summer into fall, Southerners start looking for muscadines — a popular grape native to the Southeastern U.S. Selections run from the dark purple, thick-skinned traditional muscadine to a light golden green variety. Soon, growers and consumers can add a new red variety to the mix.