Browse Home Stories - Page 10

113 results found for Home
Representatives of UGA's Soil, Plant and Water Analysis Laboratory will be on hand to answer gardeners' soil questions in downtown Atlanta on Aug. 27 at Love Local: A Soil Festival to Grow Healthier Communities. CAES News
Soil Testing
Over the past decade, there’s been a push for suburbanites and city dwellers to understand where their food comes from and to get closer to the land. University of Georgia soil scientist Jason Lessl believes that people can’t get closer to the land until they know how it works.
Melony Wilson handles livestock frequently as part of her job with the University of Georgia Department of Animal and Dairy Science. She also knows how to keep herself safe while doing so. A new Georgia 4-H program will now help 4-H agents teach children across the state how to get up close and person with livestock without contracting a zoonotic disease. CAES News
Zoonotic Disease Detectives
Georgia 4-H is piloting an educational series aimed at teaching children how to help prevent the spread of animal diseases like swine flu, salmonella, E. coli and rabies.
The National Center for Home Food Preservation has distributed 1,300 copies of the "Put it Up! Food Preservation for Youth" curriculum since it was launched in 2014. CAES News
Put it Up!
With more and more students growing their own produce through community and school gardens, it only makes sense that many students are ready to take the next step and “put up” some of those hard-earned veggies and fruits.
Water runs from a silver faucet. CAES News
Save Water
Fortunately, Georgia is not currently under drought conditions. However, more and more people are “living green” and being conservative users of natural resources. It’s easy to conserve water by following these tips from University of Georgia Extension.
The brown marmorated stink bug, a native of Asia, can be found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. To date, it is classified as a nuisance pest in Georgia, but could quickly become an agricultural pest if it gets to cotton fields and blueberry patches. CAES News
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug
A University of Georgia entomologist is asking Georgians to help track an insect that loves to stowaway in homes and has the potential to hurt the state’s cotton and blueberry crops. The brown marmorated stink bug, a native of Asia, was first spotted in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1998 and has since been found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. To date, it is classified as a nuisance pest in Georgia, but could quickly become an agricultural pest, too.
As a result of a roof leak, mold grows on the ceiling of a home. CAES News
Mold and Mildew
Mildew and musty odors sometimes develop during periods of damp weather. Controlling them can be as easy as buying a dehumidifier or placing a moisture barrier under the home.
Kathryn Holland, a graduate student in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, prepares to hang a radon testing kit in her office. CAES News
Radon Testing Kits
Your home may be filled with an invisible, radioactive gas called radon. Radon is a naturally occurring gas that comes from the decay of uranium found in most rocks and soil. It ranks as the second-leading cause of lung cancer and is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers.
Dead mouse killed by poison pellets CAES News
Rodent Patrol

As the seasons shift and people spend more time indoors, so do rodents. A University of Georgia wildlife specialist says, with a little forethought, you can rid your home of those uninvited winter guests.

Calvin Perry, superintendent of the UGA Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, Georgia, speaks about center pivot irrigation during 4-H20 camp held on Tuesday. CAES News
4H20 Camp
Southwest Georgia 4-Hers were soaked with information this week as they learned about one of the world’s most prized resources — water.
Termites feed on pieces of wood in garden soil. CAES News
Termite Behavior
Homeowners who tackle termites may think the tiny insects spend their days eating wood. But a University of Georgia entomologist says 80 percent of the time they do absolutely nothing.