Browse Soil Stories - Page 3

64 results found for Soil
CAES News
Soil Sampling
Of the mindset that it’s “better late than never,” University of Georgia Cooperative Extension soils and fertility specialist Glen Harris advises Georgia farmers to take samples of the soil in their fields for analysis.
A Georgia Master Gardener trims a shrub in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
New Year, New Landscape
A new year brings new opportunities. If one of your resolutions was to improve your lawn and garden, you may need to know where to start and what you can do in the winter.
Representatives of UGA's Soil, Plant and Water Analysis Laboratory will be on hand to answer gardeners' soil questions in downtown Atlanta on Aug. 27 at Love Local: A Soil Festival to Grow Healthier Communities. CAES News
Soil Testing
Over the past decade, there’s been a push for suburbanites and city dwellers to understand where their food comes from and to get closer to the land. University of Georgia soil scientist Jason Lessl believes that people can’t get closer to the land until they know how it works.
Brown patch disease in fescue. CAES News
Lawn Soil Tests
In home lawns, a routine soil test will help reveal any underlying issues relating to soil nutrition or pH. This is often the first step to ruling out any problems like thin spots and dead patches.
Photos of seeds available at a recent seed swap at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia. CAES News
Seed Shopping
Starting seeds indoors and growing transplants allows home gardeners to try some new varieties that are not available at local garden centers. Check catalogs produced by seed companies and try some new vegetable varieties that are easy to grow and mature quickly.
A vegetable garden in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Perfect Planting Spot
The ideal place for a vegetable garden is a level, well-drained site that receives full sun all day. The site should also get good air circulation and the soil should be loose, fertile and easy to work.
Fall is not the best time to prune most trees and shrubs. It is best to wait until late winter, around February or early March. CAES News
Winter Projects
Bleak winter landscapes and cold, uninviting temperatures can try a gardener’s patience. It doesn’t have to be that way.
Earthworms burrow through a compost pile in Butts County, Ga. CAES News
Compost Waste
Resolve to live more sustainably in 2015 by creating a compost pile or bin to help reduce household waste.
Rye and clover grow side by side in a research plot on cover crops at the University of Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville. CAES News
No-Till Field Day
Large- and small-scale farmers can learn the latest information about no-till planting at the University of Georgia’s No-Till Field Day, slated for Oct. 23 at Buffalo Creek Straw & Seed Farm in Oglethorpe County.
Spring-flowering shrubs, like this native azalea growing in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia, should be pruned after they bloom. Pruning before they bloom will cut down on the flower show. CAES News
Rearranging Shrubs
Fall and early winter are the best time to relocate large trees and shrubs. Moving established plants from one location to another can change your landscape without costing you money.