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65 results found for Water Use
UGA student Kaitlyn Lancaster passes out worms during her exhibit, while Alicia Boone (right) can't watch. CAES News
Science Night
Painting with worms. Learning more about birds. Matching wits with parents over fifth grade science questions. It’s all a part of making science fun for the whole family.
While parts of Georgia received almost 8 inches of rain this month other areas saw barely an inch of precipitation CAES News
October weather
Temperatures in Georgia were within one degree of normal across the state in October. Rainfall continued to be light across most of the state, continuing a trend from a dry September. A narrow band stretching from Columbus to the northeast mountains was the only area of the state that received higher than normal rainfall.
Endless summer hydrangea CAES News
Blue, pink or lavender?
Color variation in hydrangeas is due to the presence or absence of aluminum compounds in the flowers. If aluminum is present, the color is blue. If it is present in small quantities, the color is variable between pink and blue. If aluminum is absent, the flowers are pink.
CAES News
Central Georgia landscapes
Are you a new homeowner, or are you just looking for more confidence when you tackle projects around your home’s landscape? If you answered yes, chances are you’ve got some questions. Houston County Master Gardeners have designed a program that will provide you with answers.
Map showing precipitation totals across Georgia in July 2012. CAES News
July climate summary
Drought conditions in most parts of the state stabilized in July, although there was an increase in exceptional drought in west-central Georgia due to the heat and lack of rainfall.
Portable irrigation sets on a sod farm in Fort Valley, Ga. CAES News
Water grass wisely
There have been isolated showers across the state, but many areas have not received the much needed rain. Unless you have been watering it, the grass in your lawn is probably wilted and browning. But if you’ve been watering improperly, you may still find yourself with a less-than-healthy lawn.
Tomato leaves can curl in response to environmental stresses, like lack of water, or as a symptom of a disease, like tomato leaf curl virus, shown here. CAES News
Tomato leaf roll
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents, like myself, are getting several phone calls about the leaves on homegrown tomato plants curling and rolling inward. Curling or rolling of tomato leaves can be caused by various factors including environmental stresses, a virus or herbicide damage.
Container garden including several different plants CAES News
Hot weather stress
When the temperatures reach triple digits, we hear plenty on the news about how to take care of our pets and ourselves, but not much about our plants. Recent record temperatures can obliterate our lawns and ornamentals in just a few hours if these plants are already under stress for other reasons.
Plants love the summer sun, but June's triple-digit days had plants, and their caretakers, wilting across the state. CAES News
Too hot for plants
When temperatures start heading into 3-digit territory, even the most sun-loving plants can start suffering from the effects of Georgia’s mid-summer sauna.
Cooperative Extension Southwest District 4-H'ers play beneath center pivot irrigation at the 2012 4-H20 camp at Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, Ga. CAES News
South Georgia 4-H'ers have fun learning about water conservation.
Dozens of 4-H students playing under the dangling spray nozzle of a center pivot irrigation system may look like a fun way to cool off in the south Georgia heat. But it’s also a lesson in water conservation.