Browse Environment Stories

612 results found for Environment
Jayden Mulamoottil, a fourth-grade student at Barrow Elementary in Athens-Clarke County, placed first in Georgia's radon poster contest with an illustration imploring Georgians to check their homes for radon gas. CAES News
Radon Action Month
January is National Radon Action month, and each year University of Georgia Cooperative Extension sponsors a poster contest for students across the state to help bring awareness to the importance of radon testing.
Pam Knox visits a UGA weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Climate Input
The authors of the Southeast chapter of the Fifth National Climate Assessment will hold virtual workshops in late January and early February and are inviting the public to share their thoughts on climate change-related issues.
Beef cattle (file photo) CAES News
Cattle Emissions
It is not difficult to find somebody talking about methane these days. Simply turn on the TV, open your computers to your news affiliate of choice or log into any social media platform.
wintertime la nina pattern CAES News
La Nina
December is the start of the three-month winter season here in the Northern Hemisphere. In 2021, December started out 4 to 6 degrees Fahrenheit (F) warmer than normal. Whether this is likely to last through the rest of the winter depends on two major weather patterns that are affecting the winter climate in Georgia.
A publicly commissioned sculpture at the new home of University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in Athens-Clarke County takes the age old question of “Which came first, the chicken or the egg?” to new heights. CAES News
ACC Sculpture
A publicly commissioned sculpture at the new home of University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in Athens-Clarke County takes the age-old question of “Which came first, the chicken or the egg?” to new heights.
Pam Knox visits a UGA weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Changing World
As climate issues capture governmental and public attention — from the effects of methane emissions to weather extremes — it is incumbent on the world to take action. Experts in UGA's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are focused on helping residents address climate challenges in ways that will benefit the environment and ensure both profitability and sustainability for industry.
Don't toss your decorative pumpkins and jack-o'-lanterns in the trash this year, use these tips for sustainable disposal. CAES News
Pumpkin Recycling
Every year after the autumn holidays, more than 1 billion pounds of pumpkins are thrown away. National Pumpkin Day, Oct. 26, kicks off a week of multiplying cucurbit decor, so celebrate this year by learning how to dispose of your pumpkins in a more sustainable way.
For more than a decade, UGA scientist Sonia Hernandez has led a team that’s studying the health and behavior of the American white ibis as it moves from rural to urban areas in South Florida. Their research has implications for other urban wildlife, including coyotes, deer, raccoons and other wading birds. (Photo courtesy of Sonia Hernandez) CAES News
Country Ibis, City Ibis
The human population in Florida has boomed in the last few decades following migration of people from other states and countries, resulting in rapid urbanization. From the city outskirts, another population is also on the move — the American white ibis that used to occupy the pristine wetlands of the Everglades are now frequent visitors of the urban landscape.
Uttam Saha displays radon samples in the AESL's liquid scintillation counter, which measures radioactivity in water samples. CAES News
UGA Radon Program
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s radon testing program — a holistic program that combines radon education outreach with research, testing and mitigation — has helped optimize sampling and testing methodology for radon in water throughout the U.S. The program has influenced national standards in radon testing.
A new $1.5 million grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will help UGA scientists delve into the dynamics of coastal Georgia wetlands, researching how collapsing marshes can affect property values and storm resiliency in coastal communities. CAES News
Balancing Act
The forces at work in a marsh require a delicate balancing act. Rising and falling tidewaters keep clumps of Spartina grasses from growing too dense. But too much water makes it difficult for them to survive. Tip this balance too far in either direction and the marsh ecosystem collapses, resulting in a population of different plants — or no plants at all.