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Don't toss your decorative pumpkins and jack-o'-lanterns in the trash this year, use these tips for sustainable disposal. CAES News
Pumpkin Recycling
Every year after the autumn holidays, more than 1 billion pounds of pumpkins are thrown away. National Pumpkin Day, Oct. 26, kicks off a week of multiplying cucurbit decor, so celebrate this year by learning how to dispose of your pumpkins in a more sustainable way.
For more than a decade, UGA scientist Sonia Hernandez has led a team that’s studying the health and behavior of the American white ibis as it moves from rural to urban areas in South Florida. Their research has implications for other urban wildlife, including coyotes, deer, raccoons and other wading birds. (Photo courtesy of Sonia Hernandez) CAES News
Country Ibis, City Ibis
The human population in Florida has boomed in the last few decades following migration of people from other states and countries, resulting in rapid urbanization. From the city outskirts, another population is also on the move — the American white ibis that used to occupy the pristine wetlands of the Everglades are now frequent visitors of the urban landscape.
After molting into adults, periodical cicadas will move or fly to nearby vertical structures, especially shrubs and trees. The females will eventually lay their eggs on the ends of tree branches. CAES News
Tree Flagging
The emergence of Brood X exceeded expectations in north Georgia, as those of us who happen to reside in the “cicada zone” observed droves of periodical cicadas during the peak of the event. Over the past weeks, the song of the male periodical cicada has faded and fewer of these fascinating insects remain, but a sign of their passing is still evident.
A brood of decades-old 17-year cicadas that have been perfectly preserved. CAES News
Brood X
It has been 17 years since a set of billions of periodical cicadas emerged from their underground chambers and filled the air with boisterous buzzing and desperate mating calls.
Jessica McGuire, with the nonprofit conservation organization Quail Forever, teaches students about wildlife conservation at Shiver Elementary School, where Grady County 4-H'ers planted a pollinator garden to help students understand the importance of protecting ecosystems. CAES News
Preserving Pollinators
Eight Grady County 4-H’ers installed a pollinator garden at a local school as part of a yearlong program highlighting the importance of pollinators.
Smith posing with a bird and a research sample. CAES News
UGA entomology fellow Olivia Smith
Following the onset of several major outbreaks of foodborne pathogens traced back to wildlife, buyers of farm-fresh produce began encouraging the removal of natural habitats and nesting areas on farms to discourage wildlife intrusion.
Citizen scientists around the state can help keep track of pollinator health in Georgia by participating in the second Great Georgia Pollinator Census Aug. 21 and 22. CAES News
Counting Pollinators
Friday kicks off the second annual Great Georgia Pollinator Census coordinated by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Brown thrasher CAES News
Birds thrive on farms
A study by the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and collaborators at The Nature Conservancy and Washington State University challenges the notion that native bird species only belong in wooded habitats. This study has found that diversified farms are mutually beneficial for producers and native wildlife, creating a system where conservation and production are equal priorities.
Georgia 4-H offers digital environmental education series CAES News
Virtual EE
Each spring, thousands of K-12 students attend environmental education camps at Georgia 4-H facilities across the state. They hold snakes, hike through creeks and marshes, visit historic sites and enjoy nature; all with a goal of learning about the environment. Since the COVID-19 outbreak has public schools closed, school buses parked and Georgians sheltered in place, the Georgia 4-H Environmental Education Program is now being offered virtually.
Moles are insectivores that are closely related to shrews and bats. In the fall, there is a lot of mole activity because white grubs are starting to hatch out near the soil surface. This is one of the mole’s favorite snacks. Moles tunneling under the lawn can be a symptom of a grub problem, especially in yards that are consistently irrigated. CAES News
Mole Control
If something is digging holes in your yard, you might need to set up a trail camera to catch the animal in the act. Once the animal is identified, then you can begin to control it.