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A new study by UGA researchers on postharvest storage quality of pecans might help Georgia’s pecan producers in marketing to new consumers. Consumers, both domestically and internationally, are recognizing pecans for their health benefits, which include vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids. CAES News
Pecan Quality
The international popularity of pecans is trending upward, but more reliable measures for guaranteeing quality during storage are needed to meet demand in Georgia, the top state for pecan production.
Pecan scab fungus (Fusicladium effusum) is the most destructive disease of pecans in Georgia. CAES News
Fighting Pecan Scab
University of Georgia researchers will begin a series of trials this winter to help identify better management practices for pecan growers in Georgia.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia Beetles
Georgia pecan growers should be monitoring for ambrosia beetle now, especially if they have planted new trees or their orchards include trees that are less than three years old. The tell-tale sawdust “toothpicks” sticking out of trees is a sure sign of ambrosia beetles boring into trees.
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecan Yields Down
A year after Hurricane Michael ravaged southwest Georgia, including the region’s pecan industry, farmers still are struggling as they harvest this year’s crop, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
UGA's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is part of a collaborative effort to develop a smartphone irrigation app for pecans. CAES News
Smart Irrigation App
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is part of a collaborative effort to develop a smart irrigation application for pecan farmers on smartphone devices.
Pictured is a pecan affected by scab disease. CAES News
Pecan Scab
To protect against scab disease resistance, Georgia pecan farmers now have a new fungicide in their arsenal, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Tim Brenneman.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia Beetles
Research entomologists in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are using three grants to study ambrosia beetles in an effort to prevent future attacks and preserve more fruit and nut trees.
UGA's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is part of a collaborative effort to develop a smartphone irrigation app for pecans. CAES News
Pecan Field Day
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will host the Southeast Georgia Pecan Field Day in Baxley, Georgia, on Wednesday, Aug. 28.
Hurricane Michael's strong winds uprooted pecan trees in Tift County. CAES News
Pecan Dieback
Nearly a year after thousands of trees were destroyed by Hurricane Michael, Georgia pecan producers are reporting the dieback of pecan branches and leaf burning in trees that survived the October 2018 storm, according to Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist.
Andrew Sawyer (right), a longtime Agriculture and Natural Resources agent, will become Georgia’s Southeast District pecan agent on May 1. He is pictured with Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells. CAES News
Pecan Expert
The partnership between University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Pecan Commission yielded a new area pecan agent position for the Southeast District this year.