Browse Organic Stories - Page 3

58 results found for Organic
A garden hoe lies in a pile of fresh compost. CAES News
Organic Gardening
Organic gardening has become quite popular among gardeners, but a considerable confusion exists about what organic gardening is and what it is not.
Harald Scherm, professor of plant pathology and assistant dean for research at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will take over as department head for plant pathology on July 1, 2016. CAES News
Plant Pathology Head
After nearly two decades helping farmers combat the diseases affecting Georgia’s most prominent fruit crops, Professor Harald Scherm has been appointed head of the University of Georgia’s Department of Plant Pathology following a national search.
UGArden manager JoHannah Biang teaches Andy Myers, Lipscomb University student of sustainability and environmental agriculture, how to drive a small tractor as part of a workshop at the 2015 Georgia Organics Conference, Feb. 20-21, in Athens. CAES News
Organic Farming Classes
University of Georgia organic agriculture experts and economists are teaming up to present the Organic Farming Workshop to provide farmers with new ways to maximize the ecology and economical sustainability of their farm.
Georgia Urban Ag & Outdoor Expo CAES News
Ag & Outdoor Expo
The Georgia Urban Ag and Outdoor Expo seeks to educate the public on the roles that urban and traditional farming play in supplying food to a continually growing nation. To that end, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension poultry scientist Claudia Dunkley and UGA Extension agent Steve Pettis will be among the host of presenters at the event.
CAES News
Georgia Organics Conference
University of Georgia horticulturist David Knauft will be among the organic agriculture experts presenting at the 2016 Georgia Organics Conference set for Feb. 26-27 in Columbus, Georgia.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
UGA entomologist Ashfaq Sial inspects a blueberry bush for damage. CAES News
Spotted Wing Drosophila
A tiny fly is having a huge impact on American fruit farmers. Known as spotted wing drosophila, the insect is costing famers more than $700 million a year in lost produce and prevention costs.
Andrea Scarrow, UGA Extension Southwest District FACS program development coordinator, speaks during an Annie's Project Workshop held in Albany on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. CAES News
Female farmers
Women own 13.6 percent of America’s active farms and their farms produce almost $13 billion worth of goods each year. Just like male farmers, they need access to business and technical information to help make their farms successful. But while many pride themselves on not needing a “women’s only” class on how to work the land or run a business, many other women simply feel more comfortable learning around other female farmers.
Two women tour the organic production plots at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm during UGA's 2014 Organic Twilight Tour. CAES News
Organic Farm Tour
Organic and sustainable agriculture experts from the University of Georgia will host their fourth annual Organic Twilight Tour on Tuesday, June 23 from 6-8 p.m. at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences' Durham Horticulture Farm, 1221 Hog Mountain Road, Watkinsville, Georgia.
Seeds available at a recent seed swap at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia CAES News
Organic Seeds
The market for organic produce increases every year as does the number of farmers stepping up to meet that demand, but the number of seed companies catering this growing market is still relatively limited.