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52 results found for Commercial Weed Control
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo. CAES News
Three products approved
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved new five-year registrations for two dicamba products and extended the registration of an additional dicamba product for use on dicamba-tolerant cotton and soybeans in a decision estimated to save growers and producers of the products millions of dollars in lost revenue.
Test plots at the the J. Phil Campbell Research Farm located near Watkinsville, Georgia, show (from left) cereal rye, no cover crop, living white clover mulch and crimson clover approximately three weeks after cotton planting. Areas in red indicate where Palmer amaranth seed was planted and will be monitored for suppression and reproduction over the next several years. CAES News
Getting it covered
University of Georgia researchers are working on natural solutions to weed problems in row crops as government regulations of chemical herbicides grow stricter.
A corn plot grows for research at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko encourages farmers to continue managing their weeds even after corn is harvested this year. CAES News
Weed Control
Georgia corn farmers are preparing for harvest, but they can’t take a break once they ship their crops to market. That time should be focused on staying ahead of weeds that can cripple the next year’s crop.
Broccoli grown on the UGA Tifton Campus is pictured growing on wheat straw mulch, plastic mulch and on bare soil. CAES News
Organic Weed Control
If they start now, Georgia organic farmers can use mulch and cultivation to manage young weeds, according to Juan Carlos Diaz-Perez, vegetable scientist on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. If weeds are not controlled successfully and are allowed to grow throughout May and June, they can compete with crops for nutrients, water and sunlight.
UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day. CAES News
PSO Awards
Eight University of Georgia faculty and staff were honored for exemplary service to the state during Monday’s 2019 Public Service and Outreach awards luncheon, which included awards for Entrepreneur of the Year and Donor Impact.
UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day. CAES News
Using Pesticides Wisely
A state program aimed at teaching farmers and other pesticide applicators how to properly apply pesticides continues to limit pesticide drift in Georgia. The educational training system, called “Using Pesticides Wisely,” was created by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Department of Agriculture. UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper, who developed the training, credits Georgia farmers’ excellent teamwork and decision-making for the low number of pesticide drift complaints in Georgia in 2017.
Palmer amaranth can reach heights of up to 7-10 feet. UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko encourages farmers to continue to control Palmer amaranth even after their corn is harvested. CAES News
Palmer Amaranth Management
Georgia farmers scored what many view as a significant victory when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency extended the registration of the controversial weed killer dicamba for two years. The herbicide can be used for over-the-top weed control in cotton and soybean fields, according to Stanley Culpepper, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed specialist.
UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko sprays a pecan tree during a research study with Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells. CAES News
Pecan Trees
Dicamba and 2,4-D herbicides, sprayed directly on trees at full rates, kill the plant material they touch, but they don’t travel through the tree or linger from year to year, according to a newly released University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan study. The study also found that drift from the herbicides does not hurt the trees.
Robert Stougaard is the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He supervises the college's seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state. CAES News
Research Assistant Dean
Beginning March 1, Robert N. Stougaard will be the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He will be responsible for the overall supervision of the college’s seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state.
When using pesticides, remember that the safe and legal use of pesticides requires that the entire label be followed exactly. Contact your local Extension agent if you're unsure about a product. CAES News
Pesticide Safety
Hundreds of people get sick each year from inappropriate pesticide use, but those who don’t deal with pesticides daily may not think about it very often. Of the 11 states participating in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) pesticide safety program, workers reported 853 serious injuries from pesticides in 2011, according to the CDC.