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Anisa M. Zvonkovic has been named dean of the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences. Currently the Harold H. Bate Distinguished Professor and dean of the College of Health and Human Performance at East Carolina University, Zvonkovic will join UGA effective July 1, 2022. CAES News
New FACS Dean
Anisa M. Zvonkovic, an academic leader with a distinguished record of promoting student success and impactful research and outreach, has been named dean of the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Georgia 4-H'er Malavika Balamurali displays the dish she cooked during a virtual session of "Adulting 101," a virtual youth development series for 4-H youth that teaches life skills. CAES News
Adulting 101
Adulting is hard.
Tracey Brigman, clinical assistant professor in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, has been named interim FACS coordinator of food safety and preservation. CAES News
Teaming up to promote food preservation safety
A team of University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents, led by a faculty member in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, will address consumer questions on food safety and preservation while overseeing the National Center for Home Food Preservation on an interim basis.
Walks, jogs or bike rides around the neighborhood or local parks during social distancing are permitted by public health officials, as long as the minimum 6 feet of distance between other people is maintained. CAES News
Virtual Diabetes Program
As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of Georgia Extension Diabetes Prevention Program was challenged with shifting to a completely virtual format. Trained agents are delivering the program to community members across the state and collaborating with the University System of Georgia (USG) to offer the National Diabetes Prevention Program entirely online to faculty and staff.
National 4-H Healthy Living Photo CAES News
Healthy Habits at Home
Our nutrition and physical activity behaviors are not just the result of our personal choices. The environment or setting in which we live and family cultures and customs can also influence our choices and behaviors.
Label your food prior to freezing and include the date it was packaged. CAES News
Freezing fruits and vegetables
Freezing is one of the easiest and most convenient ways to extend the shelf life of fresh fruits and vegetables.
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
Dairy Nutrition
Widespread school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic have raised concerns about students’ lack of access to milk.
With many Americans now rapidly adjusting to working or studying from home – often within arm’s reach of the refrigerator or pantry – the temptation to overeat is a real one, and it can have real consequences. CAES News
Sheltered-in Overeating
Overeating is a normal reaction to being bored or anxious, but in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the phenomenon has taken on a new dimension. With many Americans now rapidly adjusting to working or studying from home – often within arm’s reach of the refrigerator or pantry – the temptation to overeat is a real one, and it can have real consequences.
Caffeine does not cause an increased risk of heart disease. However, people who have heart disease should consult their health care providers about caffeine intake.
Studies suggest that caffeine intake may protect against Type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease and stroke. CAES News
Coffee Intake
Many people start their day with a cup of coffee, and that’s not necessarily a bad habit. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers moderate caffeine intake to be 300 milligrams of coffee each day. That’s two to four cups. And studies show that coffee, in moderation, can promote a variety of health benefits.
The University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) has launched a newly revamped website. Known as “Food eTalk,” the program offers Georgians free, online nutrition education classes. CAES News
SNAP Website
University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed), which offers Georgians free, online nutrition education classes known as “Food eTalk,” has launched a newly revamped website at https://www.foodtalk.org/.