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Connie Robinson browses the produce at the DeKalb County Mobile Market. The market, operated by UGA Extension in DeKalb County and the DeKalb County Board of Health, brings fresh produce to communities with limited access to fruits and vegetables. CAES News
Holiday Food Supply
With supply chain issues ramping up the stress for consumers, we asked experts in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences how they thought fears about low supplies and consumer behavior might flavor the holidays.
(Illustration by Daniel Rouhani/ExonScientific) CAES News
Zoonotic Spillover
In the latter months of 2019, a novel coronavirus probably leaped from a yet-unknown animal in central China into a human. Some speculate that SARS-CoV-2 leaked from a laboratory in Wuhan, China. But evidence suggests that it’s far more likely that the virus was a natural “zoonotic” leap from animal to human. The resulting COVID-19 pandemic has killed hundreds of thousands of Americans, including more than 23,000 Georgians, and mutated into dangerous new variants.
Darian Adams (second from right) was awarded the 2021 Marie Fort Garden Club Scholarship. The $1,000 annual scholarship is awarded to a UGA Griffin undergraduate student in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Pictured with Adams are club members (left to right) Pam Kierbow, Pat Martin (treasurer), Diane Lamb (president), and Emelie Tingle. CAES News
Garden Club Scholarship
University of Georgia Griffin campus agribusiness major Darian Adams was named the recipient of the 2021 Marie Fort Garden Club Scholarship, awarded by the Griffin-based club to a UGA-Griffin undergraduate student in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Tyler Grace Hunt (left), a fourth year Hospitality and Food Industry Management major, helps a guest while working at concierge desk of the Georgia Center. (Photo: Shannah Montgomery/PSO) CAES News
HFIM and Georgia Center
The University of Georgia’s hospitality and food industry management major in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is a one-stop shop for academics and real world opportunities, ensuring that graduates not only know what they are supposed to do but how to do it. Their hands-on learning takes place at the UGA Center for Continuing Education & Hotel, where they can experience all aspects of running a hotel, conference center and restaurants.
University of Georgia student Nallely Lepiz-Madrigal, from Americus, Georgia, has been selected as one of six delegates to represent the United States at Bayer’s 5th bi-annual Youth Ag Summit. CAES News
Bayer Youth Ag Summit
University of Georgia student, Nallely Lepiz-Madrigal, from Americus, Georgia, has been selected as one of six delegates to represent the United States at Bayer’s 5th bi-annual Youth Ag Summit on November 16-17.
Tamlin and Mr. 2 17 at Doppler Studios in Atlanta GA CAES News
Hope Givers
This National Suicide Prevention Month, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences alum Tamlin Hall has launched a new documentary series for middle and high schoolers, exploring anxiety, depression, bullying, human trafficking, inclusion and more.
CAES Dean Nick Place and Associate Dean Joe Broder with CAES Congressional Agricultural Fellows CAES News
Ag Hill to Capitol Hill
For more than 20 years, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) has encouraged students to explore an important, yet often overlooked, side of Georgia’s leading industry. Since its creation in 1997, the Congressional Agricultural Fellowship has offered 123 students a firsthand look into the world of agricultural policy by placing them in legislative offices located in our nation’s capital. Each summer, a handful of CAES students move to Delta Hall in Washington, D.C., to represent the college and serve as agricultural liaisons in Georgia’s congressional offices.
Researchers in the US and Senegal are studying why young people leave peanut farming behind and move to the city, an important question for the future of farming in Senegal’s Groundnut Basin. University of Georgia PhD student Pierre Diatta and Virginia Tech’s Brad Mills (far left and left), will present early findings of the study, along with UGA agricultural economist Genti Kostandini (far right), in a webinar next week. The team is working with Katim Toure, a collaborator at ENSA (École Nationale Supérieure d'Agriculture) in Senegal. CAES News
Young Senegalese Farmers
All over the world, farmers are aging and young people are moving to more urban areas for economic opportunities. Leaders wonder what factors push young people to abandon agriculture and whether technology or other tools can make farming a more attractive option for the next generation. Next week, researchers from the University of Georgia and Virginia Tech will present early findings from research exploring those questions in Senegal, where a team surveyed more than 1,000 peanut-growing households to explore challenges among peanut producers and learn the main reasons why young people turn away from agriculture.
A new $1.5 million grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will help UGA scientists delve into the dynamics of coastal Georgia wetlands, researching how collapsing marshes can affect property values and storm resiliency in coastal communities. CAES News
Balancing Act
The forces at work in a marsh require a delicate balancing act. Rising and falling tidewaters keep clumps of Spartina grasses from growing too dense. But too much water makes it difficult for them to survive. Tip this balance too far in either direction and the marsh ecosystem collapses, resulting in a population of different plants — or no plants at all.
“To my knowledge, this is the all-time highest funding amount the UGA IPM program has received, which is incredible because this is a highly competitive national grant,” said Ash Sial, coordinator of UGA's integrated pest management program. CAES News
IPM Grant
An impressive team of University of Georgia researchers has received $765,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture Crop Protection and Pest Management Program to support the continuation of integrated pest management (IPM) programming throughout the state over the next three years.