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714 results found for Crop and Soil Sciences
GRA Eminent Scholar Chair in Crop Genomics Robin Buell working with plant specimens in her Center for Applied Genetic Technologies laboratory. CAES News
Bread Wheat Genomics
University of Georgia plant genomics expert Robin Buell is part of an international team seeking to mine an untapped genetic resource for wheat improvement by sequencing the genomes of ancient varieties representing the worldwide diversity of bread wheat. The two-year project— called the Wheat Diversity Project — is funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation and will bring Buell together with researchers from the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) and collaborators in France to sequence 12 landrace genomes.
Nathan Tesfayi with one of the communications antennas used by the small satellite lab on the roof of the Geography Geology building. (Photo by Peter Frey/UGA) CAES News
Point to Pixel
Nathan Tesfayi’s story is about resilience and big ambitions. Born in State College, Pennsylvania, to Ethiopian parents, his life journey has taken him from living in Ethiopia to studies at the University of Georgia, research with NASA and more. Tesfayi’s interest in the environment was sparked during his AP environmental sciences class at Shiloh High School in Gwinnett County.
Associate Professor Ali Missaoui, one of several University of Georgia faculty associated with the Center for Bioenergy Innovation (CBI) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, breeds switchgrass as a potential feedstock for biofuels at UGA’s Iron Horse Farm in Watkinsville. The switchgrass program is just one of the multiple UGA research projects intended to help the transportation industry move toward a more sustainable future. (Photo by Lauren Corcino) CAES News
Growing Gas
As the world grapples with how to reduce its carbon footprint, it’s clear there’s no silver bullet solution for climate change. It will take a multifaceted approach to scale back fossil fuel usage and find more sustainable alternatives. Several UGA researchers are working on promising pathways like bioenergy and bioproducts, forms of renewable energy and materials that could curb carbon emissions.
A Madagascan woman winnows peanuts. The U.S. Agency for International Development has awarded the University of Georgia $2.5 million to work with Kansas State University and scientists in Madagascar to improve food security and resilience to climate change through a rotation of peanuts, sorghum and millet. UGA's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences already is home to the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut, a 10-year, $29 million program to improve farmers' and consumers' lives through peanuts. Photo by Steve Evans though Creative Commons. CAES News
Madagascar Mission
Madagascar is particularly vulnerable to climate change. To help Madagascan farmers adapt, the U.S. Agency for International Development has awarded the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut at University of Georgia an additional $2.5 million to work in partnership with the Global Collaboration on Sorghum and Millet at Kansas State University on a resilient rotation of peanut, sorghum and millet that will improve soil conditions, make farms more productive, feed people and protect the natural environment.  
Plant geneticist Edward Buckler, a researcher with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) and an adjunct professor in plant breeding and genetics at Cornell University, will deliver the talk for this year’s Brooks Lecture and Awards, entitled “Advancing Agriculture: Leveraging Quantitative Genetics and Genomics to Improve Efficiency and Reduce Emissions.” CAES News
2023 D.W. Brooks
Plant geneticist Edward Buckler will give insight into how quantitative genetics and genomics hold the potential for greater agricultural sustainability when he presents the keynote for this year’s D.W. Brooks Lecture. The annual event, which will recognize six University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and UGA Cooperative Extension faculty, will be held in Mahler Hall at the UGA Center for Continuing Education and Hotel at 3:30 p.m. Nov. 16.
internal rot CAES News
Improving Organic Onions
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is partnering with colleagues from Texas A&M University to find more effective production practices for organic onion growers in the Southern United States. Bhabesh Dutta, associate professor in the UGA Department of Plant Pathology is leading the team over the next four years through a recently funded $3.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
Distinguished Research Professor Katrien Devos specializes in plant genetics, studying ways to optimize species like Panicum virgatum—commonly known as switchgrass—for use as feedstocks for biofuels. She is one of many UGA researchers affiliated with the Center for Bioenergy Innovation, based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. (Photo by Peter Frey) CAES News
Katrien Devos
Distinguished Research Professor Katrien Devos specializes in plant genetics, studying ways to optimize species like Panicum virgatum — commonly known as switchgrass — for use as feedstocks for biofuels. She is one of many UGA researchers affiliated with the Center for Bioenergy Innovation, based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee.
Invasion of the ear snatchers CAES News
Pod People
In honor of International Podcast Day on Sept. 30, we are highlighting a few shows out of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and UGA Cooperative Extension. You will find Cultivating Curiosity, All About the Pod and Two Agents & the FACS wherever you get your podcasts.
According to Georgia Organics, “Land Steward award winners not only foster a better environment through the soil, but through their larger community through leadership, education, and outreach.” CAES News
Restoring the Earth
Increasing populations and changing climate conditions will require both innovative and ancient growing methods to feed the world. Regenerative agriculture, a movement both burgeoning and broad, is underpinned by the public’s growing awareness of how land stewardship and agricultural production contribute to the fate of our planet.
Mel Garber sits beside his wife, Barbara Bankston. CAES News
Act of Love
Mel Garber remembers the phone call clearly. “How do we turn off the fireplace again?” His wife, Barbara Bankston, was on the other end of the line. She’d turned that fireplace on and off a thousand times. It’s a gas fireplace, so all you have to do is turn the knob, Mel told her. Maybe it was a one-time slip of the mind, he thought. They were getting older.