Browse Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories Stories

11 results found for Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories
Pam Knox visits a UGA weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Changing World
As climate issues capture governmental and public attention — from the effects of methane emissions to weather extremes — it is incumbent on the world to take action. Experts in UGA's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are focused on helping residents address climate challenges in ways that will benefit the environment and ensure both profitability and sustainability for industry.
Uttam Saha displays radon samples in the AESL's liquid scintillation counter, which measures radioactivity in water samples. CAES News
UGA Radon Program
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s radon testing program — a holistic program that combines radon education outreach with research, testing and mitigation — has helped optimize sampling and testing methodology for radon in water throughout the U.S. The program has influenced national standards in radon testing.
UGA Crop Quality Lab manager Daniel Jackson with a load of research samples from the Vidalia Onion Research Center. CAES News
Vidalia Onions
Researchers at the University of Georgia Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories (AESL) want to make sure that the Vidalia onions you buy every year are as sweet as you expect them to be.
UGA Weather Network Director Pam Knox checks one of the data-logger boxes maintained by the network. All of the observational instruments connect to the data-logger, which collects and transmits weather data at 15-minute intervals, which is then disseminated through the UGA Weather Network website. CAES News
UGA Weather Network
On June 1, 1991, the first agricultural weather station operated by the University of Georgia began transmitting data from Griffin, Georgia. Since then, the UGA Weather Network has grown to include 87 stations scattered across the state, providing weather data to a variety of users. On June 1 this year, this 30-year record of continuous weather data makes the UGA Weather Network one of the oldest state weather networks in the country.
A survey conducted by UGA researchers examined whether respondents had any concern about the growing of hemp and the creation of hemp products in their area. CAES News
Community perceptions of hemp
Hemp is a promising new industry for profitability, but growers of this newly legal crop will face a mix of public opinions according to University of Georgia research into challenges those in the hemp business may face in the southeastern United States.
Irrigation on a corn field the University of Georgia Tifton Campus (file photo). CAES News
Produce Safety
An online tool developed by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is helping produce growers assess their water quality and prepare for increased testing requirements.
The second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. UGA Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon. CAES News
Radon Action Month
Radon, an odorless, colorless, tasteless, radioactive gas, is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. and the leading cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers — and your home is far from immune to it.
UGA graduate student Jamie Morgan tests the water in an algae-filled pond on Bill Atkinson's farm in Dacula. CAES News
Toxic Algae
The sudden and unexpected death of a Marietta, Georgia, couple’s beloved dog after swimming with its owners in Lake Allatoona has filled social media feeds since the incident on Aug. 10. The incident brings to light the dangers of toxic algae growth. In neighboring North Carolina, another couple lost three dogs in one day after an afternoon swim in a pond.
Soil sample bags await processing at the University of Georgia Soil Testing Laboratory in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Spring Soil Testing
This spring, gardeners planning vegetable gardens — or even a major renovation of your ornamental beds — should take the opportunity to test their soil before they put plants in the ground.
When yards are flooded, residential well safety is of paramount importance. Cities and counties alert citizens with boil advisories when municipal water supplies are affected, but those who rely on wells for water have to monitor their water themselves. Wells that have been overtopped by flood waters need to flushed and tested for bacteria because of the potential danger of contaminants being washed into the well. CAES News
'Funny' Water
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents often get calls from homeowners who are concerned about the quality of their well water. Water from municipal sources is routinely monitored for safety, but water from private wells isn’t.