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From left, the 2022 UGA-Griffin Classified Employee Award nominees include Clay Bennett of the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Melissa Slaughter of the Center for Food Safety, Darrin Buice of Field Research Services, Ashley Biles of the Assistant Provost and Campus Director’s Office, Brett Byous of the Department of Entomology, Kimberly Allen of the Center for Urban Agriculture, Donna Kent of the Plant Genetics Resources Conservation Unit and Ree Rosser of the Facilities Management Division. CAES News
UGA-Griffin Awards
The University of Georgia Griffin campus recently named Ashley Biles and Clary “Ree” Rosser as the 2022 Classified Employees of the Year at the 33rd Annual Employee Recognition Ceremony.
UGA-Griffin is working with industry to build irrigation demonstration plots that will display ways to handle water-related issues in landscapes, hardscapes and irrigation. Breaking ground on the site are, from left, Dan Suiter, faculty advisory chairman for the Center for Urban Agriculture; Greg Huber, training coordinator for the Center for Urban Agriculture; Rolando Orellana, urban wasterwater management agent for the Center for Urban Agriculture; David Buntin, interim assistant provost and campus director for UGA-Griffin; and Reid Garner, sales manager at Hunter Industries. CAES News
Irrigation Demonstration Site
Industry professionals, homeowners and researchers will soon be able to get a firsthand look at new irrigation technologies in action at a demonstration irrigation site being constructed on the University of Georgia’s Griffin campus.
Plant selection and landscape maintenance play a critical role in pollinator populations, particularly as land use shifts to urban landscapes. Rooftop gardens, like this one on the UGA Geology Building, can provide needed resources for insects. CAES News
Urban Pollinator Conservation
Urban landscapes have become a focus in pollinator conservation. Practices in urban plant selection and landscape maintenance play a critical role in pollinator populations and the preservation of essential ecosystem services.
When pruning, it is important to remember that wherever the plant is cut regrowth will be stimulated, generally happening within 6 to 8 inches of the cut. CAES News
Pruning 101
Do you have a yard full of woody ornamentals? Are you unsure of when or how to prune them? With diverse growth habits and varying pruning requirements, it can be overwhelming to try to figure out when and how to prune each variety. Not pruning correctly, or at the wrong time, can lead to plants to become irregular in shape, more vulnerable to cold damage or pests, or less likely to flower at their full potential.
Businesses are encouraged to participate in the 2022 Great Georgia Pollinator Census, set for Aug. 19-20. In 2021, Master Gardeners held a counting event at Slow Pour Brewery in Gwinnett County. CAES News
Fourth Great Georgia Pollinator Census
Partnerships with schools, businesses and educational institutions have been crucial components in the growth of the Great Georgia Pollinator Census, which was established by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in 2019.
bee on cone flower CAES News
Starting Seeds
It’s almost that time of year again: January is the month for seed catalogs galore. Seed catalogs are the embodiment of possibility, a chance for gardeners to envision the ever-elusive perfect garden. It is one of my favorite times in the garden year.
Christmas tree close-up CAES News
Christmas Tree Recycling
If you celebrate Christmas, there is nothing like having a real tree to decorate in your home for the holidays. The festive aroma alone provides such a sense of nostalgia. But once the holidays have quickly come and gone, the next order of business is disposing of your tree.
A spring-planted dwarf Hinoki falsecypress shows transplant shock four months after planting. CAES News
Transplant Shock
Georgia gardeners will find the most success transplanting trees in the cooler seasons. But anywhere a tree or shrub dies within the first year of planting, there is usually a root issue involved. Spring-planted trees and shrubs are generally more stressed from summer heat because their roots are still underdeveloped during the first year. This results in excessive wilting, which causes well-intentioned gardeners to literally water their plants to death. 
“Slugs, by their very nature, must have moisture to survive and are known to eat damp paper on occasion,” said Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Paul Pugliese. “The moral of the story: We now know why the postal delivery service is called 'snail mail.'” CAES News
Snail Mail
Recently, a church trustee in Bartow County brought samples of “holey” mail to the local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office for closer examination. Strangely, mail deposited in the church’s mailbox was showing up with holes chewed through the outer layer of the envelopes, but the mail inside was intact — a small miracle in itself.
leafcutter bee on mountain mint (1) CAES News
Pollinator Prep
Pollinator conservation does not stop when the weather turns cool. There are a few items you can add to your pollinator to-do list for the fall and early winter to help pollinators next spring.