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Data collected by remote moisture sensors, drone-mounted cameras and automated weather stations are changing will fuel the next agricultural revolution. University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will launch a new, interdisciplinary graduate Certificate in Agricultural Data Science this fall. CAES News
Big Data Agriculture
From remote moisture sensors that produce a real-time feed of soil conditions to drones that use optical data to spot plant disease, the next green revolution will be fueled by new streams of data.
Graduate students from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences tour a research farm at Purdue University during a past Crop Protection Tour, a career exploration road trip organized by students. The students will hit the road again on July 10. CAES News
Crop Protection Career Tour
Starting July 10, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) graduate students will hit the road to explore career opportunities available in the crop protection industry and the Cooperative Extension System.
Cook County ANR Agent Tucker Price holds up a watermelon plant infected with gummy stem blight disease. CAES News
Watermelon Research
Georgia watermelon growers who have a targeted, informed disease management plan for gummy stem blight disease could save money and lessen the environmental impact of producing this favorite summertime fruit.
Scott Jackson will join the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences as a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in August 2011. CAES News
Peanut Code
An international group of agricultural scientists, including University of Georgia and USDA scientists based in Georgia, have mapped the genetic code of the peanut. Results of the five-year research project give scientists around the world a map with which to unlock some of the genetic potential of the peanut plant.
Wayne Parrott, professor of crop and soil sciences at the University of Georgia, believes that genetically improved plants will help feed the world, and he's traveled the globe to help connect farmers and scientists with what they need to make that happen. Since coming to UGA in 1988, Parrott's laboratory has served as an international flagship for genetic research in soybeans and other crops. He's spent almost the last three decades not only developing new soybean varieties and researching the human and environmental safety of genetically modified crops. CAES News
Parrott Honored
University of Georgia Professor of crop and soil sciences Wayne Allen Parrott has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, an honor bestowed by his peers for “scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.”
Local officials, regents and University of Georgia President Jere Morehead pose for a photo at the ribbon cutting of the new Turfgrass Research Building on the UGA Griffin campus. CAES News
Turf Team
University of Georgia, state and industry leaders cut the ribbon on Sept. 21 signifying the official openings of three new turfgrass research and education facilities on the Griffin, Tifton and Athens campuses. The largest of the facilities is on the UGA Griffin campus, where the ceremony took place.
Millet close-up CAES News
Resilient Pearl Millet
As farmers around the world battle extreme drought and other climate events, researchers turn to pearl millet to find ways to make other grains more resilient to climate change. A global team of 65 scientists, including nine from the University of Georgia, have decoded some of the secrets to the crop’s coping strategies.
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016. CAES News
Tomato Size Regulator
Ever wonder how that slice of tomato on your summer BLT got to be so perfectly bread sized? Geneticists at the University of Georgia have found the gene variants that control a tomato’s size. They published their findings recently in the open-access journal PLOS Genetics.  
University of Georgia scientist Peggy Ozias-Akins, a College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences professor of horticulture on the UGA Tifton Campus, applies advanced biotechnology and molecular biology tools — tools she developed herself in some cases — to improve crops like peanuts. CAES News
Ozias-Akins Honored
University of Georgia Professor Peggy Ozias-Akins has been awarded the title of Distinguished Research Professor, an honor awarded to UGA faculty recognized internationally for their contributions to knowledge and whose work promises to foster continued creativity in their discipline. She and her colleagues have created new and improved plant varieties that are higher yielding, more disease resistant, more nutritious or have greater ornamental value.
UGA's newest pecan variety, ‘Avalon’, in 2017. The pecan's extreme resistance to scab disease makes it desirable for pecan farmers looking to replenish their crop after Hurricane Michael. CAES News
Avalon Variety
Growers who are anxious to buy large quantities of the newest pecan cultivar, ‘Avalon,’ will likely be disappointed as supplies are low, according to University of Georgia pecan breeder Patrick Conner. The new UGA-bred cultivar will be released this spring.